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This blog is used to share information that I find about the families that I am researching. To see these family names click on the tab above. Please feel free to contribute your stories or research and make comments, corrections, and ask questions.

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Friday, August 31, 2018

#52ancestors Post Thirty-Four: Find Descriptions of Your Irish Family's Homes in the Census

Last week's writing prompt for #52ancestors is Non-Population. This term, related to the census, does not count people as in the Population schedules but counts those items related to resources and needs. In the United States, these non-population schedules were used to identify and quantify information related to agriculture, mortality, and manufacturing. 

In Ireland, the 1901 and 1911 census records include non-population information about the homes of our ancestors on the House and Building Return and the Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings Return.



Click to enlarge. James Murray's home is found on line 21 of this 1911 census record. 

James Murray was reported as the landowner of a house with 5 to 6 rooms in Ballyvelaghan on both the 1901 and 1911 House and Building Returns. The walls were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof was a perishable material such as wood or thatch and there were four windows in the front of the home. In 1901, there were three outbuildings; a stable, a piggery, and a barn. In 1911, there were also three outbuildings; a stable, a barn, and a cowhouse.  The home was considered a 2nd Class House.  James, Celia, Patrick, Kate, Julia, and Susan (my husband's grandmother at age 15) were living in the home in 1911. 

In 1911, the only first-class structures near the Murray home were this former police barracks and the post office building. 

In 1901, William Quinn was a landowner and lived in a private dwelling in Caheravoneen South, County Galway with his family; Bridget (his wife), John, Mary Anne, Margaret, William (my husband's grandfather - age 6), Peter, Celia, Bridget (Delia), and a servant Bridget Lyons.  

The walls of the house were made of stone, brick, or concrete and the roof was made of a perishable material (probably thatch).  There were 2, 3, or 4 rooms and two windows in the front making this a 3rd class house. Outbuildings included a stable, a cowhouse, and a piggery. 


This was the Fahy home in Caheravoneen South. In 1981, the owner, Michael Fahy, told us the Quinn home was next door until the Black and Tan burned the home in 1921. 

In 1911, Bridget Quinn was the head of the household and the landowner. She lived in the same home with five children; John, William, Peter, Celia, and Delia. 
This same home was described as stone, brick, or concrete with a perishable material for a roof. This time, It was said there were three windows on the front and it was deemed a 2nd class house. There were four outbuildings; a stable, barn, cowhouse, and shed. 

If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 


Diana
© 2018

Sources

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn

FamilySearch Wiki." Non-Population Schedules Genealogy - FamilySearch Wiki. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Aug. 2018. <https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Non-Population_Schedule

Former Barracks at New Quay - Ballyvelaghan Townland cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Mac McCarron - geograph.org.uk/p/832541 Geograph Britain and Ireland. Web. 25 Aug. 2018. <https://www.geograph.org.uk/reuse.php?id=832541>.

Residents of house 3 in Caherawoneen South (Cahermore, Galway). 1911.  Web. 25 Aug. 2018. <http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Galway/Cahermore/Caherawoneen_South/461634/>.

Residents of house 3 in Caheravoneen South (Cahermore, Galway). 1901. Web. 25 Aug. 2018. <http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Galway/Cahermore/Caheravoneen_South/1384551/>.

Residents of house 28 in Ballyvelaghan (Abbey, Clare). 1901. Web. 25 Aug. 2018. <http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Clare/Abbey/Ballyvelaghan/1066704/>.

Residents of a house 21 in Ballyvelaghan (Abbey, Clare). 1911. Web. 25 Aug. 2018. <http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Clare/Abbey/Ballyvelehan/350534/>.




Sunday, August 26, 2018

The Bryan Log Cabin in Bienville Parish - Revisited


Last year, I posted this post - The Bryan Log Cabin in Bienville Parish. I found a photo of the cabin, a two-room dogtrot, on page 59 of Louisiana Plantation Homes by W. Darrell Overdyke. In addition to seeing the cabin in this book, a sketch and description be found in the research paper Log Houses as Public Occasions: A Historical Theory written in 1977.  I won't put either on my blog as I want to avoid copyright infringement; however, I have seen the book for sale both at Amazon and eBay for reasonable prices. 

I wrote the original post to share and maybe verify a story told to me by a Wimberly/Bryan descendant (my third cousin) when visiting Bienville Parish in 2007. I was told the person who owned the land (a Mrs. "C") reported someone from Louisiana State University asked for the cabin. They removed the cabin after carefully numbering each piece. However, when LSU was called, the location of the cabin was not known. 

Below is what I have learned and what I want to know.

Last year while trying to verify the story, I learned that story was actually that of the George Washington Nix log cabin seen below.



George Washington Nix built the cabin pictured and it was passed on to his daughter, Erie Ontario Nix, and her husband, Augustus Reddick Bryan (grandson of Reddick Bryan).  

Could the Bryan log cabin and the Nix cabin be one in the same? There are no sources for the cabin pictured in Mr. Overdyke's book. I would love to see his research and sources. That might answer my questions. 

In 1999, another Bryan descendant wrote that her parents looked for the cabin in 1978 with explicit directions from the "C" family, but the cabin was not found and assumed torn down. Could this be the "C" family who owned the Nix cabin? 

In Log Houses as Public Occasions: A Historical Theory, the house was described as being built about 1850.  Reddick Bryan purchased the land where the Bryan Cemetery can be found in 1839.  Where did he build his home? Did he stay in the first house he built? 

In Mr. Overdyke's book, it is written the Bryan family left Georgia and lived in Arkansas for two years prior to moving to Louisiana. I don't believe this is correct. What about the Nix family? Did they come to Louisiana from Georgia? Did they spend a few years in Arkansas? When did they settle in Bienville Parish? 

I added land/family information to this map in hopes of learning more - I did not. The map below shows some land owned by Reddick Bryan and George Washington Nix. Click on the map to enlarge it or go to the actual google map at this link.  




I cannot locate the house or positively determine that the house in Mr. Overdyke's book was that of Reddick Bryan, my great-great-grandfather. I am always open to suggestions and always appreciate new information! I can be contacted via email or on my Facebook page (see the link below). 



Although the land was purchased by Reddick Bryan on March 2, 1839, the official patents from the government were given to buyers several years after the purchases. The patient date for this purchase is 1843. The dates found at the Bureau of Land Management Records and on townships maps are the patient dates, not the dates of the actual purchase. This document was found with original purchase records at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.








If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana
© 2018

Sources

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn. 

Family photographs from the collection of Jane Stewart Slater. 

Gates, P. (1968). History of public land law development. Washington.Web. 14 Sep. 2017. Hathi Trust Digital Library <https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.32106000891595;view=1up;seq=1>

Quinn, Diana Bryan. The Bryan Log Cabin in Bienville Parish. Blogger, 4 Sept. 2017.   
https://momentsintimeagenealogyblog.blogspot.com/2017/09/the-bryan-log-cabin-in-bienville-parish.html  

Newton, M. B. and Napoli, L. P.-D. (1977), Log Houses as Public Occasions: A Historical Theory. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 67: 360–383.  https://www.jstor.org/stable/2562336?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

Overdyke, W. Darrell. Louisiana Plantation Homes, Colonial, and Antebellum.  New York: American Legacy Press, 1981.

Sunday, August 19, 2018

#52ancestors Post Thirty-Three: Were Your Bryans Famous?

William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925)

This week's writing prompt for #52ancestors is Family Legend.  Merriam-Webster.com defines a legend as a story coming down from the past.  In my family, there are some family stories I will not / cannot write about. There are others that have been proven, some I cannot prove, and, others, I seriously doubt. 

My Bryan family passed on this short list of famous people that were thought to connect to us; some Bryans and some not. 

John Nance Garner

John Nance Garner was a Texas congressman and Vice President under Franklin Delano Roosevelt during his first two terms. He is not connected to my family. However, my grandfather's sister, Terrell "Bunch" Bryan married a James D. Biggs. John Nance Garner is connected to this Biggs family. 


John Neely Bryan

John Neely Bryan is known as the founder of Dallas, Texas. Although his last name is Bryan, I found him while researching my Hairston family. He is connected to the Hairstons only by marriage. See more at this link.


William Jennings Bryan

When Bryan family members learn I am researching family, they ask about the family's link to William Jennings Bryan. William Jennings Bryan was a Democratic and Populist leader who ran unsuccessfully three times for the U.S. presidency between 1896 and 1908. 

If there is a link, I doubt I will find it in my lifetime. William Jennings Bryan was born in Marion County, Illinois in 1860 and his father (Silas Bryan) born in Culpepper, Virginia in 1822. Silas Bryan's father was John; also of Culpepper.  My Bryan family was in North Carolina at this time. My Reddick Bryan was probably the same age as John of Culpepper. If there is a link it would be many, many generations beyond the unproven father of my Reddick Bryan. 


Daniel Boone

Daniel Boone's wife was Rebecca Bryan; born before 1740 in Virginia. If there is any connection at all to my Bryan family it would again need to be many, many generations beyond the unproven father of Reddick Bryan. 


James Stephen Hogg


James Stephen Hogg was governor of Texas from January 20, 1891 to January 15, 1895. My father mentioned several times that Governor Hogg was family. I found a connection when I was researching Hairstons and learned he is probably very distantly related. See more at this link. 


If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana
© 2018 

Sources

Britannica.com. William Jennings Bryan AMERICAN POLITICIAN.  Britannica, July 2018. Web. 19 Aug. 2018. 

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn. 

Meriam- Webster. Definition of Legend. Web. 19 Aug. 2018. <https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/legend>.

The Terrell Bryan and Harriet Albritton Family


Terrell Bryan and Harriet Louisa Albritton
Date Unknown (Best guess is about 1880)


Terrell Bryan and Harriet Louisa Albritton were married on February 20, 1855 in Bienville Parish, LA.   Terrell, the son of Reddick and Elizabeth Regan Bryan, was born in Georgia (probably Houston County) on November 17, 1836.  Harriet, the daughter of Peter and Hollon Albritton, was born in Twiggs County, Georgia on August 15, 1836.  

Terrell farmed in Louisiana until the Civil War.  He was a private in the "Castor Guards," part of the 16th Louisiana Infantry.  Terrell was wounded at Shiloh and at Missionary Ridge.  During the war, Harriet and her children lived at the home of Harriet's mother in Louisiana.  By 1877, Terrell and his family were living in Eastland County, Texas. They moved to Erath County in 1878 or 1879. 

On the back is Terrel and H. L. Bryan  Stephenville, Texas  age 65 May 1899. 


In Erath County, he did some farming, served as Justice of the Peace for a few terms, managed the Poor Farm, opened a wagon yard, and even tried selling books. He attended the Methodist Church and was active in local politics, the Masons, and Woodmen of the World. 

Terrell and Harriet had ten children; Joseph H. Bryan, Frances L. Bryan, Terrell (Bunch) Bryan Biggs, Hollon S. Bryan Latta, Alice Amanda (Allie) Bryan Hammett, Redic Eli Bryan (my grandfather), Dorothy Elizabeth Harriet (Dollie) Bryan Wylie, Laura Louise Bryan Keith, Willie A. Bryan, and James T. Bryan. 

Harriet died on February 9, 1909 at her home in Erath County, Texas and Terrell died on May 16, 1920 at the Wylie home in Cooke County, Texas.  Both are buried in West End Cemetery in Stephenville, Erath County, Texas. 

I have written many posts about Terrell and Harriet. Here are just a few. 




Children of Terrell and Harriet Albritton Bryan


1.   Joseph H. Bryan    b: February 18, 1857 in Bienville Parish, LA    d: August 11, 1857 in Bienville Parish, LA.  


Birth and death dates found in Terrell Bryan's family bible.
Joseph H. Bryan's burial place is unknown.


2.  Frances L. Bryan    b: February 13, 1859  in Bienville Parish, LA   d: December 24, 1894 in Erath County, TX


According to this cemetery stone, Frances died in 
1904. However, it is written in the family  bible as 
1894; age 35 years, 10 months, and 11 days.  This 
would  make the 1894 year correct. I have never 
found another record or report of her death. 







3.  Terrell (Bunch) Little Bryan    b: July 13, 1861 in Bienville Parish, LA    d: April 02, 1939 in Wheeler, TX



Terrell "Bunch" Bryan married James "Jim" Daniel  Biggs in
Erath County on May 16, 1880.

Read this blog post for additional information about Bunch - Friday's Photo: Terrell Little "Bunch" Bryan.


4.  Hollon (Holly) Span Bryan    b: August 24, 1865 in Bienville Parish, LA    d: September 01, 1906 in Fort Worth, Tarrant, TX



Hollon Bryan married James Alonzo Latta in
Erath County on September 4, 1881.

These blog posts have additional information about Hollon and her family.

        



5.  Alice (Allie) Amanda Bryan    b: November 21, 1867 in Bienville Parish, LA    d: June 12, 1953 in Post, TX

Alice Amanda "Allie" Bryan married John Regan Hammett in 
Natchitoches, Louisiana on September 11, 1887.

Read this blog post for additional information about Allie's family - Sunday's Obituary: John R. Hammett




6.  Redic Eli Bryan    b: August 02, 1870 in Bienville Parish, LA    d: August 29, 1929 in Seymour, TX


Redic Eli Bryan married Johnie Myrtlene "Myrtie" Hairston in 
Erath County, Texas on February 7, 1900 in Erath County, Texas.

Read these blog posts for more information about Redic and his family.



7.  Dorothy (Dollie) Elizabeth Harriet Bryan    b: January 17, 1873 in Bienville Parish, LA    d: November 26, 1948 in Robert E. Lee, Coke Co, TX

        
Dollie Bryan married Thomas Sumter Wylie in 
Erath County, Texas on July 21, 1889.

Read these blog posts for additional information about Dollie and her family.




8.   Willie A. Bryan    b: August 21, 1875 - probably in Bienville Parish, LA    d: October 26, 1878 in Erath County, TX


Birth and death dates found in Terrell Bryan's family bible. 
Willie A. Bryan is buried in Old Valley Grove Cemetery; age three years, two months, 
and three days. 




9.  Laura L. Bryan    b: April 28, 1878 in Erath County, TX    d: July 18, 1908 in Erath County, TX

Laura Louise Bryan married William Harve Keith in 
Erath County, Texas on June 25, 1899.
        

These blog posts contain additional information about Laura and her family.



10.  James T. Bryan    b: February 02, 1884 in Erath County, TX    d: March 17, 1884 in Erath County, TX


Birth and death dates found in Terrell Bryan's family bible. 
The Stephenville Empire, February 9, 1884.
Both Terrell and Harriet would have been 47 years old when James T. Bryan was born. 

James T. Bryan is buried in Old Valley Grove Cemetery. According to the family bible, he died at age six weeks.  


If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana

© 2018

Sources

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn.

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Marguerite Cook Clark. Accessed April 28, 2014, September 14, 2014, and November 9 to 11, 2016. Used with permission.

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Sue Pierce and Pat Waas. Accessed 2006. Used with permission.

Jones, Ken.  Frances L. Bryan (1869-1894). Find A Grave Memorial. Web. 30 Aug. 2015. Used with permission. <https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/28974168/frances-l.-bryan>.

Jones, Ken.  James J. Bryan (1884). Find A Grave Memorial. Web. 30 Aug. 2015. Used with permission. <https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/28974392/james-j.-bryan#source>.

Jones, Ken.  Willie A. Bryan (1875-1878). Find A Grave Memorial. Web. 30 Aug. 2015. Used with permission. <https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/28975523/willie-a.-bryan>.

Quinn, Diana B. Moments in Time, A Genealogy Blog: #52ancestors Post Eleven: The Bryan Family Bible. Blogger, 2018. Web. 19 Aug. 2018. <https://momentsintimeagenealogyblog.blogspot.com/2018/03/52ancestors-post-eleven-bryan-family.html>

The Stephenville Empire (Stephenville, Texas), Vol. 12, No. 23, Ed.1 Saturday, February 9, 1884. Accessed 25 June 2017. The Portal to Texas History.

Friday, August 17, 2018

Friday's Photo: A Revisit to the Chapel

Early in June, I posted  #52ancestors Post Twenty-Three: Going to the ChapelThis is a collection of wedding photos that belonged to my husband's parents, Doris Staubach and William Quinn. I suspect most of the weddings occurred in New York in the 1950s. In my post, I was asking for clues to the identities or familial relationships the brides or grooms may have had with my husband's family. 

In this post, photos #1 and #3 are now correctly identified. I would love to add last names and family connections to the remaining photos. 

If you know the identity of these brides and/or grooms OR know of any connection they may have to family, please contact me via email or leave a message on my Facebook page. 

1. Previously labeled as unknown, this photo is that of 
Patricia (Patsy) Quinn Ryan, daughter of William Joseph Quinn and Susan Murray, 
my father-in-law's oldest sister. 

2. Marie and John
On the back is written April 1951 - John died Aug. 1951


3. This photo has been correctly identified as Edward F. Ryan and 
Helen Quinn. Helen was my father-in-law's twin. However, 
on the back is written Helen Kenny and William Montero 
along with a telephone number (see below). After a little 
searching, I found Helen Kenny in 1940 living at 
225 West 153rd  Street very close to the Quinn family at 
219 West 153rd Street. Someone must have used the photo to 
jot down her phone number.


4. April 1952 - Marie and Cornelius
Cornelius was a groomsman in Doris and Bill's Wedding

5. Robby and Mary

6. Unknown Bride and Groom

If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana
© 2018

Sources

Family photographs and documents from the collection of  Diana Bryan Quinn.