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This blog is used to share information that I find about the families that I am researching. To see these family names click on the tab above. Please feel free to contribute your stories or research and make comments, corrections, and ask questions.

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My posts can be accessed by the date posted from the column on the right. Blog posts containing specific surnames can be found by clicking on the names in the left column.

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Sunday, February 24, 2019

New Quinn Family Finds and More Questions

Brothers, John and William Quinn. Photos taken in the late 1920s.

My husband had a close DNA match on his Quinn side and I spent several weeks looking for more about his grandfather's siblings. I thought it would be easy, but not so much. 
Ellen Buckley and John Quinn
November 22, 1927

John Quinn was one of my targets. He is an older brother of my husband's grandfather, William Quinn (#2). I was excited to find his wife's (Ellen/Ellie Quinn) naturalization papers at Ancestry. In the papers, I found her maiden name (Buckley), her place of birth (County Kerry), John's date of arrival from Ireland, and exactly when and where he completed his naturalization. 





According to Ellen's papers, John was naturalized June 8, 1918, at Camp Wadsworth, in South Carolina. I didn't find those records online so moved on to his arrival in the states. It was written that John entered the United States on October 8, 1914, in Boston. I had never looked in Boston.

I searched the Massachusetts, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1820-1963 at Ancestry.com. Only one John Quinn was found traveling from Ireland to Boston in 1914. This 21-year-old, John Quinn, was the son of Peter Quinn of County Kerry. He arrived in Boston on May 14, 1914. 

I did find a Willie Quinn arriving in Boston on October 6, 1914. I believe this might be John Quinn who for some unknown reason used his brother's name. The ship record indicates he was the son of Mrs. William Quinn in Caheravoneen, Kinvara and was going to live with his sister, Margaret Quinn, in Louisville, Kentucky.  

Click to enlarge

Although it is possible that William Quinn traveled to the United States in October 1914, I believe the Willie in the above clip from the manifest is actually John. It would be nice to have more input or suggestions as to where else I might look. Here are some of the facts I considered. Please tell me what you think. 

  • Mrs. William Quinn in Caheravoneeen was the mother of both men. 
  • Margaret Quinn, sister to John and William, was living in Louisville.
  • John Quinn arrived in the United States in October. The date on his wife's naturalization record is October 8, 1914. On his passport application, he stated he came over on October 28, 1914. The actual arrival date of "Willie Quinn" was October 6, 1914. 
  • On the ship manifest, Willie's age is 19. John would have been 24 years old and William / "Willie" 20 years old. 
  • According to the ship's manifest Willie (maybe John) was 5 feet 9 inches tall, had a dark complexion, dark hair, and brown eyes. The description of William Quinn on the ship's manifest in 1921 stated he was 5 feet 10 inches tall, with a dark complexion, black hair, and brown eyes. On the more specific draft registrations in 1942, John's eyes were gray-green and he had a ruddy complexion. William's eyes were hazel and his complexion was ruddy. 
  • On William Quinn's pension record from the Irish Defence Forces Military Archives in Dublin, Ireland. William wrote that in 1914 he joined the Irish Volunteers, Kinvara Company and he was active in drilling, training, and organizing. His participation in the company increased in 1915.
  • William Quinn came to the United States in 1921. It was written on the manifest that it was his first time in the USA. 

I was told that William Quinn did not use his real name when he traveled to the USA in 1921, but I was able to easily find him on a ship's manifest as William Quinn. Maybe the story was about John. And, if John felt the need to use William's name when he left Ireland, what was the reason?


If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana

© 2019

Sources

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn. 

Family photographs from the collection of Mary Meaney Weber. Used with permission.

“Massachusetts, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1820-1963 for Willie Quinn.” https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/8745/MAT843_229-0296?indiv=try&h&db. Accessed 24 Feb. 2019.

New York, State and Federal Naturalization Records, 1794-1940 for Ellie Quinn.https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/2280/31301_168092-00911/3985051?indiv=try&h&db. Accessed 23 Feb. 2019.

Quinn, Diana B. “Moments in Time, A Genealogy Blog: The Family of William Quinn and Bridget Brannelly.” https://momentsintimeagenealogyblog.blogspot.com/2019/01/the-family-of-william-quinn-and-bridget.html. Accessed 24 Feb. 2019.

Sunday, February 17, 2019

Before Presidents' Day

The postcard is unused with no date. However, this 46-star
flag would be seen after Oklahoma became a state in 1908
and before the statehood of Arizona and New Mexico in 1912. 

After the death of George Washington in 1799, his birthday on February 22 became an unofficial day of remembrance. In 1879, Washington's birthday became a holiday in the District of Columbia and, by 1885, a national holiday.

Washington's birthday was moved to the third Monday in February in 1971 as a result of the Uniform Monday Holiday Act. The change from February 22nd led to the commercial combining of Washington's birthday and Lincoln's February 12th birthday for the purpose of three-day weekend sales. By the early 2000s, most states considered the third Monday in February Presidents' Day and many recognize it as a day to honor the lives of all American Presidents. However, official federal government calendars still list the third Monday in February as Washington's Birthday. 

If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 


Diana

© 2019

Sources

Postcard from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn

Presidents Day 2019 - HISTORY. Web. 4 Feb. 2019. <https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/presidents-day>.

Friday, February 8, 2019

Friday's Photo: Bertha Davis Hawkins, Hattie Page Meredith, and Damon Meridith

Hattie Page Meredith - left
Bertha Davis Hawkins - right
Damon Meredith - in the bucket
A DNA match to my great-grandmother's family had me looking at old Davis photos. This photo shows my great-grandmother, Bertha Davis, along with Hattie Page Meredith (Bertha's niece), and Damon, son of Hattie, in the tub. This appears to be about 1926, one of the times my grandfather, Claude Davis, visited his mother, Bertha. I assume this photo was taken in Edmonson County, Kentucky. 

To read more about my Davis family click on the links below.

Documenting My Davis Family: A Genealogical Challenge

Documenting My Davis Family: Olive Caroline Davis

Friday's Photo: Dora Davis Page

#52ancestors Post Forty-Two: Conflicting Information About Edward Davis of Edmonson, Kentucky

Friday's Photo: Claude L. Davis

If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds.  

Diana

© 2019

Sources

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn

Sunday, February 3, 2019

From the Files of Marguerite Cook Clark: Eudora "Dora" Wimberly Givens





Two weeks ago, I posted the obituaries and a photo of Octavia "Tavia" Wimberly Gillon. Today, I have her sister's obituary. 

Son of Samuel W. Givens and
Sallie Elizabeth Butler
Find-A-Grave
Eudora "Dora" Wimberly Givens was about a year older than her sister. She was born on March 12, 1891, to Hugh Robert Wimberly and Lula Martha Lawson. 

Dora's father, Hugh Wimberly, and brother-in-law, J. Frank Allums, owned the Wimberly-Allums Store from at least 1910. 

Before her marriage to William Albert Givens in 1919, I found Dora mentioned frequently in community news. She was very involved in the family's store. As early as 1912 she was going on buying trips to St. Louis and New Orleans. 

Dora married William Albert "Jack" Givens on December 22, 1919, at her parents home.  Jack, often found in newspapers as "Albert" or "W. Albert," was the agricultural demonstrator in Lincoln Parish, Louisiana. After their marriage, Dora and Jack moved to Winnsboro. From Jack's obituary, it appears they moved to Ringgold and lived there for a long period of time. 

It was written in the Wimberly book that the Wimberly-Allums store closed once Hugh Wimberly died in 1936. Could this store have been the predecessor to The Economy Store? Readers of the post about Tavia mentioned that Dora and her husband worked in the Economy store along with Tavia and her husband. 

If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds.




Diana

© 2019

Sources

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Marguerite Cook Clark. Accessed April 28, 2014, September 14, 2014, and November 9 to 11, 2016. Used with permission. 

Newspapers.com 

Wimberly, Vera. Wimberly Family History: Ancestors, Relatives, and Descendants of William Wimberly, Pioneer from Georgia to Louisiana, 1837. Houston, Tex.: D. Armstrong, 1979. Print. 

Friday, February 1, 2019

Friday's Photo: C. A. Giddens - Men's and Boys' Wear, Clothing, ETC. - St. Louis, Missouri

7622-24 South Broadway, St. Louis, Missouri

A portion of a letter assumed to
be written by Charles Giddens.
My great-grandfather, Charles A. Giddens, owned a men and boys clothing store in St. Louis, Missouri by 1923, throughout the 1930s, and possibly the early 1940s. The building, at 7622-24 South Broadway, was built about 1885. According to the National Register of Historic Places, the building is brick and two stories with a flat roof surrounded by a brick cornice. It is described as having three doors, including one to access the second story. The first story has been remodeled and is sided with vertical boards but some of the original cast iron facade is exposed on the outer edges. 

If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana
© 2019

Sources

7622-24 South Broadway, St. Louis, Missouri. Google Maps. Web. 1 Feb. 2019. <https://www.google.com/maps/place/7622+S+Broadway,+St.+Louis,+MO+63111/@38.5466852,-90.2604517,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x87d8b6f4beeab2a9:0xd003e3cf3937bd24!8m2!3d38.5466852!4d-90.258263>.

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn.

National Register of Historic Places, St. Boniface Neighborhood Historic District, St. Louis Missouri 7622 S Broadway. https://dnr.mo.gov/shpo/nps-nr/01000948.pdf