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Thank you for visiting my blog!

This blog is used to share information that I find about the families that I am researching. To see these family names click on the tab above. Please feel free to contribute your stories or research and make comments, corrections, and ask questions.

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My posts can be accessed by the date posted from the column on the right. Blog posts containing specific surnames can be found by clicking on the names in the left column.

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Friday, April 21, 2017

Friday's Photo: Quinn Cousins

Front: Maureen Quinn
Middle: Helen Quinn and Patsy Quinn
Back: Eddie Dawson

Maureen, Helen, and Patsy were daughters of William Quinn. Eddie Dawson was
the son of William Quinn's sister, Margaret "Maggie" Quinn Dawson. 

Helen Quinn, Mary Margaret Meaney, Patsy Quinn

Helen and Patsy were daughters of William Quinn while Mary Margaret was the
daughter of his sister, Mary Ann Quinn Meaney. 

I have always assumed these photos were taken in Kentucky. Mary Margaret Meaney Weber, of Kentucky, sent them to me.  Did all of these cousins visit Mary Margaret and her family in Kentucky or did Mary Margaret and her family visit New York? 

These photos look as if they were taken on a rooftop. The William Quinn family lived on the fifth floor of an apartment building on 135th Street in New York City and family pictures were often taken on the rooftop. Check the rooftop photos at my post Friday’s Photo: On the Rooftop. The rooftops in these photos certainly have some similarities.

If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 


Diana

© 2017

Source

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Mary Margaret Meaney Weber. 2007. Kentucky. Used with permission.

Friday, April 14, 2017

Friday's Photo: Easter 1965




These photos taken during an Easter trip in 1965 depicts my family as I knew it throughout my childhood. With the exception of my Dad, who did not come on this trip to New York, all are pictured - my maternal grandparents, an aunt and uncle, two first cousins, my brother, my mom and me. 

My dad's parents died when he was young and he had three sisters and a niece who lived in Texas; far from my home in Virginia. I knew nothing about his family and very little about my mother's extended family. 

My curiosity about family turned into a life long passion. I love finding and meeting family, unraveling the mysteries, and being this family's storyteller. 

If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 


Diana

© 2017

Source

Family photographs and documents from the collection Diana Bryan Quinn.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

William Quinn and His Siblings Attended the Northampton National School in County Galway


The Northampton National School, built in 1853, is now a private residence. 

Five of the seven children of William Quinn and Bridget Brannelly were listed as scholars on the 1901 census of Caheravoneen South in County Galway. John - age 10, Mary Anne - age 12, Margaret - age 9, William - age 6, and Peter - age 4 were the scholars.  Children in Caheravoneen "attended school about a mile up the road" according to our friend who knew the area well. 

The local school was Northampton National School. It was was opened in May 1853. It is possible several generations of Quinns attended the school. A new school building opened in the 1950s. 

On the 1911 census, it was reported that William and Bridget Quinn's children, Peter, Delia, and Celia, attended school. Peter might be in a 1910 photo of the boys attending the school. Click here to see the photo the boys and other local Northampton/Kinvara photos.  

The Northampton National School served children from many neighboring townlands. Children attended school until about age 14. The younger students were taught in the rooms to the right of the building and the older students in rooms on the left side. Boys and girls were schooled together, but during recess were separated by walls in the outside play area. 

Our friend, formerly of Caheravoneen, attended school in the old building and later purchased and beautifully renovated the old school as his private residence. He gave us a tour of the old school (his home) and also showed us much of the surrounding area. 



If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 


Diana
© 2017

Source

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn.

Breatnach, C., & Korff, A. (1997). Kinvara: a seaport town on Galway Bay. Newtownlynch, Kinvara, Co. Galway: Tír Eolas.

Residents of a house 3 in Caheravoneen South (Cahermore, Galway). N.p., n.d. Web. 9 Apr. 2017. <http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Galway/Cahermore/Caheravoneen_South/1384551/>.

 Ireland Census 1911 Transcription. FindMyPast.com. Web. 12 Apr. 2017. <http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=ire%2fc1911%2f2000025>.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Obtaining Death Records at 1 Werburgh Street in Dublin

William Quinn, my husband's great-grandfather died in 1903. 

In 1981, on my first trip to Ireland, I came home with a suitcase full of Waterford, Belleek China, Irish beverages, and many other souvenirs. 

My needs and desires have definitely changed. Last year, I came home with a few books about the 1916 uprising activities in County Galway and 20 death records. 

Prior to my trip, I posted questions on a few Facebook groups about the best places to go to get the death records. Most told me to try to get them in the specific counties. A few suggested the General Register Office (GRO) at Roscommon, but no mention of the GRO at Dublin. 

However, the GRO at 1 Werburgh Street in Dublin was my only option. I was with my husband and daughter who did not want to make a side stop in Roscommon or spend hours in libraries or offices in two different counties (Clare and Galway). AND, we were already going to Dublin for a few days. 

We took a cab to 1 Werburgh Street, but finding the building took awhile. 


The cab driver dropped us off next to the white building on the right.
We walked around looking for an entrance before we realized the GRO was behind the parking lot across the street.
 


Once we found the GRO, obtaining the records was easy. The employees at the research center were helpful and I was very prepared*. In less than 2 hours, I requested 20 death records and was on my way. The actual death records came to me via email the following day. 

The cost of the 20 death records was 80 euros - about $84. Much less than the Waterford Crystal purchased in 1981. 


*Prior to leaving for Ireland, I checked the Ireland, Civil Registration Deaths Index, 1864-1958 at Ancestry. com for each desired death record and recorded needed information. This index can also be found at FamilySearch.org (FREE) and at Find My Past.com

All of the information, except the film number, can be important when requesting the records at the GRO. I recorded only the death year for some of my records and had to look up the three months seen on each record to determine the quarter. 


If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 


Diana
© 2017

Sources

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn. 

Werburgh St - Google Maps. Web. 11 Apr. 2017. <https://www.google.com/maps/@53.3425043,-6.2699155,3a,15y,90.75h,91.73t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sccWjzmSBPEVnyXa7VFMntg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1>.

Ireland, Civil Registration Deaths Index, 1864-1958. Ancestry.com. Web. 11 Apr. 2017. <http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=2534>

William Quinn in the Ireland, Civil Registration Deaths Index, 1864-1958. Ancestry.com. Web. 11 Apr. 2017. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&db=fsirelandcivregdeath&gsfn=william&gsfn_x=NP_NN_NIC&gsln=quinn&gsln_x=NN&catbucket=rstp&pcat=34&fh=3&h=4514650&recoff=5%206&ml_rpos=4>.

Friday, April 7, 2017

Friday's Photo: Ireland 2016

Kinvara, County Galway, Ireland 
This time last year, I was in Ireland with my husband and daughter. I wrote two posts about the trip and then put everything away - never to get back to it.  In addition to a very nice vacation, I learned a lot about the places the Murray and Quinn families lived as well as a little more about their lives.

If you are interested in my husband's Quinns and Murrays, you can look forward to posts in the coming weeks about these families, their homes, and earliest known ancestors. 

Last year's posts about this trip are below. 

Friday's Photo: In Remembrance of the Kinvara Company Irish Volunteers 1916 - 2016

Friday's Photo: William Quinn - What would he think?


If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana

© 2017

Source


Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Bryan Family Relationships Found in Account Books of a Martin County, North Carolina Merchant




When I discovered this microfilm, I had hoped to find my Reddick Bryan buying merchandise for his mother, father, and grandparents. All would be named and their relationship to Reddick confirmed. 

The microfilm I am referring to is the Thomas Devereux Hogg Papers (see the complete reference in my sources). Included in Mr. Hogg's papers were David Clark's account books from the years 1798 to 1836. Mr. Clark was a planter at Albin and a merchant at Hogston and Hamilton in Martin County, North Carolina. 

Although I read the entire film, the most valuable portion for my purposes was that of Volume 6 - Daybook for mercantile business at Hogston and Hamilton, Martin County, 1798 - 1811. There were many Bryans in Martin County during the early 1800s and sorting families can be difficult. This gave me Bryan names and some relationships.  Unfortunately, not Reddick Bryan's family. 



Bryans found in the Daybook
Not all years were complete. The list stopped in 1808 and was followed by a few miscellaneous records. 


1798
Joel Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
Lewis Bryan
Hardy Bryan
Joseph Bryan
Robert Bryan
James Bryan

1799
Joel Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
Lewis Bryan
Hardy Bryan
Joseph Bryan
Robert Bryan
James Bryan
Thomas Bryan

1800
Lemuel Bryan

1801
Thomas Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
Lewis Bryan
Hardy Bryan
Joseph Bryan
Robert Bryan
James Bryan


1802
Thomas Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
Lewis Bryan
Hardy Bryan
Joseph Bryan
Robert Bryan
James Bryan

In January 1802, Lemuel purchased cloth, a stick twist, buttons, and salt. These items were picked up by William West.

January 1802, Robert Bryan for L. Bryan (notes receivable)

On January 1, 1802, Hardy Bryan purchased stockings and cravats. These were picked up by his son, James.

Also on January 1, 1802, Thomas Bryan purchased a blanket.  Robert Bryan also purchased a blanket; however, it was picked up by his son, Thomas.

Items picked up for Joseph Bryan by son Harry. 

No date recorded - Hardy Bryan purchased nails. His son Joseph picked up the nails. 

1803
Thomas Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
Lewis Bryan
Hardy Bryan
Joseph Bryan
James Bryan
Joel Bryan

1804
Thomas Bryan
Joseph Bryan
Wm. Bryan


1805
Joseph Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
L. Bryan

1806
Mary Bryan 
James Bryan

1807
On December 5, 1807, Robert Bryan purchased salt and it was picked up by William West.

On December 9, 1807, Thomas Bryan purchased salt. His purchase was immediately followed by a purchase by Lemuel Bryan for a pair of shoes and salt. Both orders were picked up by William West. 


1808
On March 7, 1808, the second entry in the daybook was that of Lemuel Bryan.  He purchased red cloth, buttons, cashmere, and silk. The third entry that day was for Thomas Bryan who purchased buttons, cashmere, silk, a stick twist and a stamp note.  At the end of Thomas Bryan’s purchase “by brother” was written indicating that Thomas’ brother would be taking the items.  It can be assumed that as the purchases were similar, consecutive in the book and that Lemuel and Thomas were the only Bryans who purchased that day, that they may be brothers. 


Other surnames seen on the film included:
Wimberly, Wimblys, Cherry, Bellflower, Smith, Hunter, Cone, Price, Moore, Hyman, Council, Wheatly, Brown, Sherrod, Manning, Taylor, Britt, Baker, Rhodes, Bembry, Watts, Pitman


If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana

© 2017

Sources

Daybook for mercantile business at Hogston and Hamilton, Martin County, 1798-1811, in the Thomas Devereux Hogg Papers #344, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Microfilm.

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn


Saturday, April 1, 2017

Friday's Photo: Thomas Leroy "Whit" Criswell


Mary Louise Criswell (daughter of Thomas Leroy Criswell), 
Thomas Leroy "Whit" Criswell, and Willa Mae Bryan (my father's sister). 

My father, Whit Criswell Bryan was named for his mother's favorite uncle, Thomas Leroy "Whit" Criswell. 

Thomas Leroy Criswell was born on January 18, 1864 in Texas. He was a son of William Moore Criswell and Mary Ann "Polly" Evans. The family moved to Falls County, Texas sometime in the 1860s.  He was the 9th of 13 children and brother to my great-grandmother, Lodema Walker "Dink" Criswell Hairston. Thomas Leroy died on November 13, 1934, in Odds, Falls County, Texas. 

If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana

© 2017

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn

Friday, March 24, 2017

Friday's Photo: Mary Ann Quinn and Lawrence D. Meaney

William B. Meany
Catherine Keaney
Mary Ann Quinn
Lawrence D. Meaney


This photo of Mary Ann Quinn and husband, Lawrence D. Meaney, was passed on to me by their daughter, Mary Margaret Weber, in 2007. Mary Ann Quinn was a sister of my husband's grandfather. Today, the following marriage announcement was found at Newspapers.com. 


Mary Ann Quinn Meaney - marriage announcement
Marriage announcement found at Newspapers.com



According to the announcement, they were married on a Wednesday in April of 1919. This would probably have been April 30, 1919 at St. Louis Bertrand's church in Louisville, Kentucky. I was told that Mary Ann and Lawrence were the couple on the right. Mary Weber thought the other man was a McTighe and the woman, Ms. Keaney. However, in the clipping, William B. Meaney and Catherine Keaney were the attendants. Mary Weber wrote that Catherine Keaney was a cousin and according to this marriage announcement, the reception was held at the home of the bride's cousin, Mayme Keaney. 

So, how were the Keaney's related to the Quinns? Do they have a connection to the Dwyer family? Mrs. Dwyer was listed as an Aunt on Mary Ann Quinn's ship record. Mrs. Dwyer lived in Indiana and paid for Mary Ann's passage. 

You can learn more about Mary Ann Quinn and Lawrence Meany by visiting my Quinn/Murray web pages. Click here. 

If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana
© 2017

Sources

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Mary Margaret Meaney Weber. 2007. Kentucky. Used with permission.

Meaney - Quinn, Mary Ann. Marriage Announcement. Newspapers.com. Kentucky, March 15, 2007. Web. 24 Mar. 2017. <https://www.newspapers.com/clip/9789850/mary_ann_quinn_meaney_marriage/>.

Year 1919 Calendar. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Mar. 2017. <https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/?year=1919>.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Friday's Photo: An Important Celebration in Bienville Parish



My Bryan family ancestors took quite a few photographs and they can be found all over the United States. On Sunday, I posted a photo of Joe and Josie Cook along with an article about their golden anniversary celebration. These were found in Marguerite Cook Clark's collection. Fourteen hundred miles away from Marguerite Cook Clark's collection is the Frye Family collection where photos of those who attended the celebration can be found. 

I was able to identify the family in these photos with the help of a few readable labels in the photo album and by looking at other identified photos. However, there could be an error in the identification of the women. If you find a mistake, please contact me or leave a comment on my blog. 



Under the photo in the picture was written Mrs. Liza Davis, Mrs. Lizzie Bryan, Mrs. S. E. Frye, Mrs. Erie Bryan. Above the photo Mr. and Mrs. John L. Wimberly can be seen. Rev. Thomas Martin, Laura Bryan Martin, Josie Bryan Cook, and Joe W. Cook were seen in other identified family photos.
Click on the picture to enlarge. 

Above this photo "their children" is written. Comparing these men and women with other photos of Josie and Joe's children, allowed me to identify family members in this photograph.
Click on the picture to enlarge. 
To see more about this celebration click here.




If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana

© 2017

Sources

Family photographs and documents from the Frye Family collection. Accessed June 6, 2016. Used with permission.

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Marguerite Cook Clark. Accessed April 28, 2014, September 14, 2014, and November 9 to 11, 2016. Used with permission.

Sunday, March 12, 2017

From the Files of Marguerite Cook Clark: Joe and Josie Bryan Cook

Joe and Josie Cook


Copyright of the embossed mat appears to be 1892




Joseph "Josie" Sarah Catherine Bryan and Joseph "Joe" W. Cook were married on November 20, 1873. They lived in Bienville Parish. 

The article to the left states they were celebrating their 52nd anniversary. This would make the date of the celebration November 22, 1925. However, note the number 52nd is written over. Enlarged, the writing is not clear and the clipping is not dated, but we can guess this is at least their 50th. 

If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 


Diana

© 2017

Source

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Marguerite Cook Clark. Accessed April 28, 2014, September 14, 2014, and November 9 to 11, 2016. Used with permission.