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Thank you for visiting my blog!

This blog is used to share information that I find about the families that I am researching. To see these family names click on the tab above. Please feel free to contribute your stories or research and make comments, corrections, and ask questions.

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Friday, August 15, 2014

Friday's Photo: Happy Birthday!






Happy Birthday to my wonderful husband. You are still as much fun as you were 35+ years ago. 

Diana

© 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: #31 Robert Hairston Married Sarah Lang

The solid lines indicate that the connection to the family is documented while
the dotted lines indicate that direct evidence has not yet been found to
make the connection. Click on the family tree to see a larger image.


No Story Too Small
I am a little behind in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge. This is post #31 and by Wednesday, I hope to be caught up with post #33. 

Since my last post about John Hairston of Alabama (NOT my great-great-grandfather), three distant relatives mentioned Robert Hairston and Sarah Lang in their email. So, as usual, I had to know more. 

The Hairston History and many Public Trees at Ancestry.com state that John and Ann Robertson are the parents of Hugh Brown Hairston, Robert Hairston and several others. However, no sources were given to verify this information. 

So, I don't know if Robert Hairston and Hugh Brown Hairston were brothers or even the sons of John Hairston and Ann Robertson, but my DNA matches indicate that they were probably related in some way. Note, on my family tree, dotted lines indicate that no direct evidence has been found to make the connection. 

In a 1981 publication of the Texas State Genealogical Society, Maxine Alcorn submitted a transcription of Robert Hairston's family Bible which gives a record of Robert Hairston, his wives, and his children.  Click on this link to The Portal to Texas History to see the two page transcription. 


The will of Ann Robertson Hairston, as found in The Hairston History, gives everything to Sarah Ann Hairston, a granddaughter. According to Robert Hairston's Bible, he had a child named Sarah Ann.  So, what do we know about Sarah Ann? Can this Sarah Ann can be definitively linked to Ann Robertson Hairston?  

Diana

© 2014

Sources 

Ancestry.com. Public Member Trees [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2006.

Hairston, Victor , and Edward Bregenzer. The Hairston History.  1998. Print.

Texas State Genealogical Society. Stirpes, Volume 21, Number 3, September 1981, Christine Knox Wood, editor, Journal/Magazine/Newsletter, September 1981; digital images, (http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29528/ : accessed August 15, 2014), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, http://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Texas State Genealogical Society, Tyler, Texas.

Friday, August 8, 2014

Friday's Photo: Rockaway Beach

Doris wrote " Rockaway - July 2, 1949 me, Jeannette, Marie, Lil, Rita"


Last week, I posted a photograph of my mother at what I thought was Jones Beach and she corrected me saying that it was Rockaway Beach. Her parents lived in Queens at the time and Rockaway Beach is a neighborhood on the south shore of Long Island in the borough of Queens.  


This Friday's Photo, also at Rockaway Beach, is one that once belonged to my mother-in-law, Doris Staubach Quinn. Doris is at the top left, looking so very glamorous at the beach. At the time, Doris lived in Manhattan with her mother and was working in an office. It is thought that these are co-workers as some of these women have been found in other photos from office events or parties. 

Diana

© 2014

Sunday, August 3, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: # 30 NOT MY John L. Hairston

The solid lines indicate that the connection to the family is documented while
the dotted lines indicate that direct evidence has not yet been found to
make the connection. Click on the family tree to see a larger image.


John is a common name in the Hairston family.  My great-great-grandfather, John Lewis Hairston, born about 1812 in South Carolina, is easily confused with a few other John Hairstons of the same generation.
No Story Too Small

My focus today is John Hairston who was born March 22, 1811 in South Carolina. He is frequently confused with my great-great-grandfather, John L. Hairston, and some part of his life often shows up in John L.’s online family trees.  Ed Bregenzer, one of the compilers of The Hairston History, contacted me in February of 2000 as he thought that I was a descendant of this John Hairston (#30).  

I am referring to this John Hairston as (#30) as this is the 30th week of my 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge and this will help distinguish him from my great-great-grandfather who I will refer to as John L. 

Three similarities found in the table below show why these two John Hairstons are so easily confused.


According to The Hairston History, this John Hairston (#30) is the son of Robert Hairston and Sarah Lang.  If this is correct, he may be the nephew of Hugh Brown Hairston as both Hugh and Robert are thought to be sons of John Hairston and Anne Mary Robertson.  And, if he is the nephew of Hugh Brown Hairston, then he may very well be the first cousin of my great-great-grandfather, John L. Hairston.

Click see a larger image
John Hairston (#30 with no known middle initial) married Syrene Thompson on October 5, 1835 in Montgomery County, Alabama.  By the 1840s, he was serving as a Justice of the Peace in Macon County, Alabama. 

In 1850 and 1860, John Hairston (#30) was living in Macon County, Alabama with his wife Syrene and children. As Justice of the Peace, he took a statement from Sarah McElhaney Hairston (probable mother of my John L. Hairston) for a pension request in the year 1854.  

In 1870 and 1880, John Hairston (#30) and his wife were living in Lowndes County, Alabama with or near several of their children.  John died on September 18, 1890 and is buried at the Myrtlewood Cemetery in Fort Deposit, Lowndes County with his wife Syrene and some of their children. His will and probate records can be found at FamilySearch. 


It should now be obvious that the John Hairston (#30) of Macon and Lowndes Counties in Alabama and my great-great-grandfather, John L. Hairston, are not one in the same. However, until this year, I believed that this John Hairston (#30) also had a
middle initial of “L.”  Only in online family trees do you see this “L.” On all court, census, and other records found, his name is simply “John Hairston.”

If you have a John Hairston in your family tree at Ancestry.com, FamilySearch, or some other site, check your tree to determine if you have combined facts from more than one John Hairston. It is easy to do.  If #30 is YOUR John Hairston, please contact me. I have more to share. 



Diana

© 2014

Sources:

"Alabama, Marriages, 1816-1957," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FQ8G-P92 : accessed 02 Aug 2014), John Hearston and Syrene Thompson, 05 Oct 1835; citing reference ; FHL microfilm 1492030.


"Alabama, Probate Records, 1809-1985," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-25316-19407-71?cc=1925446&wc=M6DJ-MM3:220031401,220031402 : accessed 02 Aug 2014), Lowndes > Administration records 1870-1892 vol A > image 42 of 333.

"Alabama, Probate Records, 1809-1985," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-25316-18186-63?cc=1925446&wc=M6DJ-MM3:220031401,220031402 : accessed 02 Aug 2014), Lowndes > Administration records 1870-1892 vol A > image 306 of 333.

"Alabama, Probate Records, 1809-1985," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-25313-10602-69?cc=1925446&wc=M6DV-TN5:220031401,220226501 : accessed 02 Aug 2014), Lowndes > Minutes 1870-1938 vol A-B > image 217 of 463.


"Alabama, Probate Records, 1809-1985," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-25313-8034-39?cc=1925446&wc=M6DK-D66:220031401,220386501 : accessed 02 Aug 2014), Lowndes > Wills 1830-1936 > image 394 of 428.

Ancestry.com. Alabama, Deaths and Burials Index, 1881-1974 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

Ancestry.com. Alabama, Select Marriages, 1816-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2014.

Ancestry.com. Public Member Trees [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2006.

Compiled Military Service Record, Phillip R. Hairston, Pvt., Co. G, 21 Alabama Infantry; Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Alabama; Record Group 109: Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1762 – 1984; National Archives, Washington, D.C.; digital images, Phillip R. Hairston's file, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : accessed 28 July 2014)

Compiled Military Service Record, Richard L. Hairston, Pvt., Co. G, 12 Alabama Infantry; Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Alabama; Record Group 109: Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1762 – 1984; National Archives, Washington, D.C.; digital images, Richard L. Hairston's file, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : accessed 28 July 2014)

"Find A Grave: Myrtlewood Cemetery." Find A Grave - Millions of Cemetery Records and Online Memorials.. Web. 2 Aug. 2014. <http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&GSln=Black&GSiman=1&GScid=24840&CRid=24840&pt=Myrtlewood%20Cemetery&>.

"Find A Grave: Pilgrims Rest Cemetery." Find A Grave - Millions of Cemetery Records and Online Memorials. Web. 2 Aug. 2014. <http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&GSln=hairston&GSiman=1&GScid=25406&CRid=25406&pt=Pilgrims%20Rest%20Cemetery&>.

Hairston, Victor , and Edward Bregenzer. The Hairston History.  1998. Print.

McElheney, William., no. R. 6697; Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, microfilm publication M804 (Washington, D.C. National Archives and Records Service, 1974); digital images, Fold3 (http://www.Fold3.com : accessed 20 July 2014).

"Mississippi, State Archives, Various Records, 1820-1951," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-21745-68357-35?cc=1919687&wc=MMYG-KNQ:n1410068766 : accessed 24 Dec 2013), Hinds > County tax rolls 1831-1848, Box 3655 > image 286 of 319.

"Texas Items." Galveston Tri-Weekly News.  13 Apr. 1870, 97 ed.: 1. GenealogyBank.com.


Year: 1850; Census Place: Hinds, Mississippi; Roll: M432_372; Page: 165A; Image: 336.

Year: 1850; Census Place: District 21, Macon, Alabama; Roll: M432_9; Page: 241A; Image: 101.

Year: 1860; Census Place: Hinds, Mississippi; Roll: M653_582; Page: 674; Image: 206; Family History Library Film: 803582. 


Year: 1860; Census Place: Southern Division, Macon, Alabama; Roll: M653_14; Page: 786; Image: 305; Family History Library Film: 803014.


Year: 1870; Census Place: Calhoun, Lowndes, Alabama; Roll: M593_25; Page: 437A; Image: 497; Family History Library Film: 545524.

Year: 1880; Census Place: Falls, Texas; Roll: 1302; Family History Film: 1255302; Page: 190B; Enumeration District: 038.

Year: 1880; Census Place: Fort Deposit, Lowndes, Alabama; Roll: 20; Family History Film: 1254020; Page: 117A; Enumeration District: 106; Image: 0536.


Year: 1880; Census Place: Parkers and Brenton, Escambia, Alabama; Roll: 12; Family History Film: 1254012; Page: 191B; Enumeration District: 076.

Year: 1900; Census Place: Fort Deposit, Lowndes, Alabama; Roll: 26; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 0077; FHL microfilm: 1240026.


Year: 1900; Census Place: Sandy Ridge, Lowndes, Alabama; Roll: 27; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0080; FHL microfilm: 1240027.

Friday, August 1, 2014

Friday's Photo: At the Beach


Just a quick summertime post!! This is a photo of my mother in 1935. I assume that this is Jones Beach on Long Island and I will correct this if I am wrong. She has such a happy face. 

Diana

© 2014

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Friday's Photo: Amelia Regan Baker - She kept in touch with family.

Amelia Regan Baker


I saw this picture while perusing the photos and genealogy papers of the late Marguerite Cook Clark in April of this year. The photo was unlabeled and in a very old album, but I knew immediately that it was Amelia "Millie" Regan Baker, the sister to my great-great-grandmother, Elizabeth Spann Regan Bryan.  I had seen the same photo on Randy Regan's Cousin Web Page several years ago. On the back of Randy's copy is written, Millie Baker (sister to grandmother of Miss Dollie Singletary.) She was a Regan - Miss Dollie's grandmother was a Regan. Sallie Regan.


Elizabeth Spann Regan Bryan
I love to find evidence that families kept in touch. Millie left her home and much family in North Carolina by 1830 to live in Alabama and, around 1868, moved to Texas. The above photo was sent to Bryan family in Bienville Parish, Louisiana. Randy Regan's photo was probably sent to North Carolina as Dollie Singletary's grandmother, Sarah P. Regan Smith, was born and died in North Carolina. 

Millie, born in 1806, was one of eleven children named in Joseph Regan, Sr.'s will dated April 10, 1843. In one sentence he named his beloved daughters Elizabeth S. Bryant, Nancy Evans, Amelia Baker, Sarah Smith and Dorothy Thompson.  

Millie married John W. Baker in Robeson County, North Carolina in 1828. They had eight children born after 1830 in Alabama. By 1850, John Baker had passed away and Millie was living with her children in Coffee County, Alabama. Ten years later, the family was living in Dallas County, Alabama. Some of her children moved to Texas after the Civil War and by 1870, Millie was living in Hays County, Texas with her son Daniel and lived very near her daughter, Delcina, and sons, Weston and Eli. 

In 1877, Milie wrote to Georgia Ann Frances, daughter of Elizabeth Regan Bryan in Bienville Parish. She was living with her son Eli, his wife, and her son Daniel in Kimbel County, Texas. 

By 1880, Millie was back in Hayes County, living with her daughter, Delcina, and family. Millie died on August 19, 1896 and is buried at San Marcos Cemetery in Hays County.

Diana

© 2014

Sources

"Amelia Regan 'Millie'." Randy's Cousin Web Page. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 July 2014. <http://regan.org/genealogy/all/all-o/p447.htm>.

Baker, Amelia. "Letter to Georgia Ann Frances "Fannie" Bryan Pittman Wimberly from Amelia Regan Baker." Bienville Parish, Louisiana. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 July 2014. <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bryanquinn/Bryan-WillsdeedsobitLA-FanniePittmanfromAmelia%20Baker.htm>.


County Court Records Lumberton, NC and FHL # 0418149 item 2.


"Joseph Regan , Sr.." Randy's Cousin Web Page -. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 July 2014. <http://regan.org/genealogy/all/all-o/p396.htm>.


Photograph of Amelia Baker used with permission. From the Marguerite Cook Clark collection.

Year: 1850; Census Place:  , Coffee, Alabama; Roll: M432_3; Page: 281B; Image: 560.


Year: 1860; Census Place: Summerfield, Dallas, Alabama; Roll: M653_8; Page: 865; Image: 369; Family History Library Film: 803008.


Year: 1870; Census Place: Precinct 1, Hays, Texas; Roll: M593_1590; Page: 195B; Image: 398; Family History Library Film: 553089.


Year: 1880; Census Place: San Marcos, Hays, Texas; Roll: 1310; Family History Film: 1255310; Page: 34B; Enumeration District: 076.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: #29 Sarah McElhaney Hairston might be my Great-Great-Great-Grandmother.


The solid lines indicate that the connection to the family is documented while
the dotted lines indicate that direct evidence has not yet been found to
make the connection. Click on the family tree to see a larger image.


No Story Too Small
According to Mary Lee Anderson's manuscript, Volume II The WHITAKER and Related Families, Sarah McElhaney (also spelled McElheney, McIlheney, and McElhenney) was the wife of Hugh Brown Hairston. Many of their said to be children were born in South Carolina so it would be safe to assume that they married in South Carolina. However, on-line sources, many rolls of microfilm, and numerous volumes at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City failed to reveal this marriage in South Carolina or Georgia.

Although I have never seen Sarah McElhany Hairston paired with Hugh Brown Hairston on any record, I believe that I found her in two census records living with some of those said to be Hairston children. 
  • In 1870, Sarah Harston was 80 years old and living in Lee County, Alabama. This time, the birth year was 1790. Sarah was again reported to have been born in South Carolina. She was living with V. Hairston (maybe #25) and three Stolling children (could that be Stalling?). 
Sarah can't be found in the 1860 census. Sons Robert and Vinson continued to live in Macon County.  In 1854, Sarah was in Macon County when she gave information to Justice of the Peace John Hairston (NOT my great-great-grandfather, John L. Hairston) about her parents.  This document is transcribed below.

Georgia
State Alabama
Macon County
Personally before one John Hierston a Justice of the Peace for said County came Sarah Hurston who being sworn says she knew  William McElhany and his wife Rebecca (whose maiden name was Rebecca Coleman) as far back as the year seventeen hundred and ninety five That she always understood they were legally married in the State of Georgia sometime in the year seventeen hundred and Eighty seven and they til their death lived together as man and wife.  That the said William McElhaney died in the year Eighteen hundred and forty and was reported to be a soldier of the revolution and filed his application for pension therefore and his wife died the 15th of April Eighteen hundred and fifty three {ink blot – might be “and maintained”} a family of many children while living as man and wife.

Sarah Hairston {her signature}
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 30th day of September 1854.
John Hairston J.P. {his signature}


If William and Rebecca were her parents, Sarah was entitled to the pension if it could be proved that her father was a soldier of the Revolutionary War. As both parents were deceased, was this her request for the pension? I may never know the answer to this question, but I do know that I should look into the McElhaney/McElhenney/McElheney family. If Sarah McElhaney Hairston is my great-great-great-grandmother, then maybe, William McElhaney and Rebecca Coleman are my great-great-great-great-grandparents.



Diana

© 2014

Sources:
Anderson, Mary Lee. Volume II The WHITAKER and Related Families. Date unknown. Print and online

McElheney, William., no. R. 6697; Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, microfilm publication M804 (Washington, D.C. National Archives and Records Service, 1974); digital images, Fold3 (http://www.Fold3.com : accessed 20 July 2014).

Year: 1850; Census Place: District 21, Macon, Alabama; Roll: M432_9; Page: 276B; Image: 173.

Year: 1860; Census Place: Northern Division, Macon, Alabama; Roll: M653_14; Page: 842; Image: 361; Family History Library Film: 803014.

Year: 1870; Census Place: Loachapoka, Lee, Alabama; Roll: M593_23; Page: 305A; Image: 184; Family History Library Film: 545522.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Friday's Photo: Summer at Saratoga Lake


My mother-in-law, Doris Quinn, spent parts of her summers at Saratoga Lake in New York. Here she is pictured with family and friends in 1942 at Saratoga Lake. Doris is seated next to Delores Tabner Houlihan and her son Dennis. In the back row are her parents, Charles and Helen Driscoll Staubach, and Jim Tabner, father of Delores. 

Diana

© 2014