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Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Bryan Family Relationships Found in Account Books of a Martin County, North Carolina Merchant




When I discovered this microfilm, I had hoped to find my Reddick Bryan buying merchandise for his mother, father, and grandparents. All would be named and their relationship to Reddick confirmed. 

The microfilm I am referring to is the Thomas Devereux Hogg Papers (see the complete reference in my sources). Included in Mr. Hogg's papers were David Clark's account books from the years 1798 to 1836. Mr. Clark was a planter at Albin and a merchant at Hogston and Hamilton in Martin County, North Carolina. 

Although I read the entire film, the most valuable portion for my purposes was that of Volume 6 - Daybook for mercantile business at Hogston and Hamilton, Martin County, 1798 - 1811. There were many Bryans in Martin County during the early 1800s and sorting families can be difficult. This gave me Bryan names and some relationships.  Unfortunately, not Reddick Bryan's family. 



Bryans found in the Daybook
Not all years were complete. The list stopped in 1808 and was followed by a few miscellaneous records. 


1798
Joel Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
Lewis Bryan
Hardy Bryan
Joseph Bryan
Robert Bryan
James Bryan

1799
Joel Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
Lewis Bryan
Hardy Bryan
Joseph Bryan
Robert Bryan
James Bryan
Thomas Bryan

1800
Lemuel Bryan

1801
Thomas Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
Lewis Bryan
Hardy Bryan
Joseph Bryan
Robert Bryan
James Bryan


1802
Thomas Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
Lewis Bryan
Hardy Bryan
Joseph Bryan
Robert Bryan
James Bryan

In January 1802, Lemuel purchased cloth, a stick twist, buttons, and salt. These items were picked up by William West.

January 1802, Robert Bryan for L. Bryan (notes receivable)

On January 1, 1802, Hardy Bryan purchased stockings and cravats. These were picked up by his son, James.

Also on January 1, 1802, Thomas Bryan purchased a blanket.  Robert Bryan also purchased a blanket; however, it was picked up by his son, Thomas.

Items picked up for Joseph Bryan by son Harry. 

No date recorded - Hardy Bryan purchased nails. His son Joseph picked up the nails. 

1803
Thomas Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
Lewis Bryan
Hardy Bryan
Joseph Bryan
James Bryan
Joel Bryan

1804
Thomas Bryan
Joseph Bryan
Wm. Bryan


1805
Joseph Bryan
Lemuel Bryan
L. Bryan

1806
Mary Bryan 
James Bryan

1807
On December 5, 1807, Robert Bryan purchased salt and it was picked up by William West.

On December 9, 1807, Thomas Bryan purchased salt. His purchase was immediately followed by a purchase by Lemuel Bryan for a pair of shoes and salt. Both orders were picked up by William West. 


1808
On March 7, 1808, the second entry in the daybook was that of Lemuel Bryan.  He purchased red cloth, buttons, cashmere, and silk. The third entry that day was for Thomas Bryan who purchased buttons, cashmere, silk, a stick twist and a stamp note.  At the end of Thomas Bryan’s purchase “by brother” was written indicating that Thomas’ brother would be taking the items.  It can be assumed that as the purchases were similar, consecutive in the book and that Lemuel and Thomas were the only Bryans who purchased that day, that they may be brothers. 


Other surnames seen on the film included:
Wimberly, Wimblys, Cherry, Bellflower, Smith, Hunter, Cone, Price, Moore, Hyman, Council, Wheatly, Brown, Sherrod, Manning, Taylor, Britt, Baker, Rhodes, Bembry, Watts, Pitman


If you want to know more about the families I research, click here to like my Facebook page where you will see each post and other genealogical finds. 

Diana

© 2017

Sources

Daybook for mercantile business at Hogston and Hamilton, Martin County, 1798-1811, in the Thomas Devereux Hogg Papers #344, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Microfilm.

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn


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